LIFELONG LEARNING from McKenzie Study Center

Philosophy

Resources discussing philosophy from a Christian perspective.

Articles

  • Proof by Chris Swanson. Discusses the definition of 'proof' and compares the validity of everyday experience with mathematical proof. (1/14; posted 4/15)
  • Common Sense for a Postmodern Age by Gilmore Greco. Discusses the nature of knowledge and the project of philosopher Thomas Reid. (6/13; posted 4/15)
  • Four Dangerous Ideas by Chris Swanson. Discusses social and cultural beliefs that have become so ingrained in our cultural psyche that we cannot see them for what they are. (6/14; posted 6/14)
  • Truth Detectors by Chris Swanson. Proposes that people are born truth-detectors and that they are very good at it. (01/13; posted 3/13)
  • Chaos and Order by Chris Swanson. Discusses the shift from the view of the natural world as chaotic and to ordered and the ramifications of that shift for Western civilization. (09/11; posted 3/13)
  • Address to the Gutenberg Class of 2011 by Jack Crabtree. Gives advice to graduating seniors who desire to become wise. (08/11; posted 3/13)
  • The Problem of Meaninglessness by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores the ways in which intellectual culture affects finding meaning. (5/11; posted 6/11)
  • War Between the Bookshelves by Tim McIntosh. Explores the difference between literature and philosophy. (3/11; posted 6/11)
  • Reading Through Narrative by Tim McIntosh. Relates a personal journey from doubt to belief. (4/10; posted 2/11)
  • The Integrity of a Truth Seeker by Toby Johnston. Discusses how our culture and Christians view "Truth" and describes the responsibility of the Truth seeker. (8/08; posted 1/10)
  • A Dialogue by Ron Julian. Explores Christianity's claims as a valid and coherent worldview. (4/06; posted 1/08)
  • Reconciling Philosophy by Peter Wierenga. Explores the question, "Why would a Christian care to read non-Christian and even anti-Christian thinkers?" (6/05; posted 10/07)
  • Pagan Christianity by Earle Craig. Compares modern Christianity and ancient pagan idolatry. (12/; posted 6/06)
  • Seekers, Truth, & Fulfillment by R. Wesley Hurd. Asks whether we can find a vision of life that is true. (4/01; posted 1/02)
  • Postmodernism by R. Wesley Hurd. Explains the nature and impact of postmodernism. (6/98; posted 2/01)
  • Me and My Worldview by R. Wesley Hurd. Illuminates the concept of a worldview and why it is important. (9/96; posted 2/01)
  • Sometimes It’s Not Nice To Love by Margaret Sholaas. Shows how true love sometimes requires a painful honesty. (3/95; posted 2/01)
  • An Abortion That Should Have Been? by Margaret Sholaas. Considers the worth and meaning of a human life in the face of great suffering and loss. (4/94; posted 2/01)
  • Dueling with Dualism by Nancy Scott. Argues that dualism is a continuing trap for today's church. (7/93; posted 2/01)
  • Modern Madness by David Crabtree. Explores how moral relativism has contributed to our inability to understand the world. (6/93; posted 2/01)

Audio Series

Audio series with talks related to Philosophy.

  • If you use iTunes to manage your audio/video files, you can download many of these files at our iTunes U site.
  • Many of the MSC audio files below were first recorded at Reformation Fellowship, where some of the MSC staff teach.

  • Biblical Philosophy: The Message and Worldview of the Bible. At Reformation Fellowship, a church in Eugene, OR, Jack Crabtree leads a discussion that systematically looks at the teaching, the message, and the whole worldview that is given to us in the Bible. (Also on iTunes)
  • Christianity & Truth. Many people no longer believe "truth" exists. Is Christianity, which claims to be the truth, a meaningful contender for how one should understand reality? This 2001 McKenzie Study Center class explored "truth" and its relation to Christianity. (McKenzie Study Center is an institute of Gutenberg College.) (Also on iTunes)
  • Foundations of Knowing the Truth. A series designed to promote an understanding of the basis upon which a person comes to know what they know to be true from a biblical point of view. These talks were given as part of McKenzie Study Center's Biblical Worldview Program in 1991-1992. McKenzie Study Center is now an institute of Gutenberg College. (Also on iTunes)
  • Issues in a Biblical Worldview. Because what we believe determines what we do and how we live, we will never do anything more practical than to clarify our thinking about our faith and our world. This series examines some of the issues Christians face as they undertake the process. The talks were given as part of McKenzie Study Center's Biblical Worldview Program in 1991-1992. McKenzie Study Center is now an institute of Gutenberg College. (Also on iTunes)
  • Kierkegaard's Coffee House. Often called the first existentialist philosopher, Kierkegaard has influenced both Christian and non-Christian thinkers. In these talks (given at Imago Dei Church in Portland, Oregon, on April 14, 2007), Gutenberg tutors explore the relevance of Kierkegaard's project to the Christian believer. (Also on iTunes)
  • Soren Kierkegaard (Summer Institute 2007). Often called the first existentialist philosopher, Kierkegaard has influenced both Christian and non-Christian thinkers. Talks given at Gutenberg College's 2007 Summer Institute explore the relevance of Kierkegaard's project to the Christian believer. The play "Son of Abraham" by Tim McIntosh was also presented. (Also on iTunes)
  • The Bible and the History of Ideas. Gutenberg tutor Jack Crabtree surveys some of the more important moments in the history of philosophy, theology, religion, and culture. And he gives a comparative critique of those various philosophies and ideas from a biblical perspective. (This is a McKenzie Study Center series. MSC is an institute of Gutenberg College.) (Also on iTunes)
  • The Problem of Evil (Summer Institute 2012). Given all the evil in the world, can God be good? Gutenberg tutor Jack Crabtree addresses the problem of evil in four talks at the Gutenberg 2012 Summer Institute, "What the 'Bleep' Can We Know?" (Also on iTunes)
  • What the BLEEP Can We Know? (Summer Institute 2012). Oceans of data now lie at our fingertips, but deep understanding seems farther and farther off. Science and faith seem divorced. Philosophy and everyday life seem completely unconnected. Can we bridge these chasms? Gutenberg tutors explored these questions at the Gutenberg College 2012 Summer Institute, "What the *Bleep* Can We Know?" (Also on iTunes)

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