LIFELONG LEARNING from McKenzie Study Center

Articles

Here you will find all the articles on this site listed by date posted, most recent first. Use the search feature or the “Authors” link on the left to find articles on particular topics or by particular authors.

Articles

  • An Algebra Apology: Or what has algebra got to do with anything anyway? by Chris Swanson. Gives a reason for why studying Algebra remains an important thing to do. (7/14; posted 7/14)
  • Four Dangerous Ideas by Chris Swanson. Discusses social and cultural beliefs that have become so ingrained in our cultural psyche that we cannot see them for what they are. (6/14; posted 6/14)
  • Is “Leftism” the Primary Cause of the “Beast”? by Charley Dewberry. Responds to Jack Crabtree's paper, "How to Follow Jesus When You Cannot Kill the Beast" (Summer Institute 2013), by analyzing the meaning of "Leftism." (8/13; posted 5/14)
  • Religious and Intellectual Commitments by Chris Swanson. Responds to Jack Crabtree's paper, "How to Follow Jesus When You Cannot Kill the Beast" (Summer Institute 2013), by looking at factors that affect how people commit to their beliefs. (8/13; posted 10/13)
  • We Have Met the Beast, and He is Us by Earle Craig. Responds to Jack Crabtree's paper, "How to Follow Jesus When You Cannot Kill the Beast" (Summer Institute 2013), by examining how all human beings are hostile to God. (PDF) (8/13; posted 8/13)
  • How to Follow Jesus When You Cannot Kill the Beast by Jack Crabtree. Explores what it will look like to exist as a follower of Jesus in the emerging hostile society and how believers can prepare for such a future. (PDF) (8/13; posted 8/13)
  • Summer Institute 2013: How to Follow Jesus When You Cannot Kill the Beast by Multiple Authors. From July 31 to August 3, 2013, Gutenberg College held its Summer Institute, “How to Follow Jesus When You Cannot Kill the Beast.” The Institute centered on a paper written by Gutenberg tutor Dr. Jack Crabtree in which he claims that American culture is quickly, and inexorably, becoming an anti-Christian state and then explores what [...] (08/13; posted 8/13)
  • A Dialog on Education: A Socratic Approach to Choosing the Right College by Chris Swanson. Discusses the nature of education by using a fictional conversation between friends. (5/13; posted 6/13)
  • Dismissed by Ron Julian. Responds to the growing cultural trend of dismissing Christians and their beliefs as irrational and bigoted. (04/13; posted 4/13)
  • The Future of Higher Education by David Crabtree. Describes the upheaval in higher education and speculates on its future. (03/13; posted 4/13)
  • Truth Detectors by Chris Swanson. Proposes that people are born truth-detectors, and they are very good at it. (01/13; posted 3/13)
  • Three Students Speak by Multiple Authors. Addresses the question of how Gutenberg graduates take Gutenberg into their futures lives. (08/12; posted 3/13)
  • In That Day, They Will Fast by Jack Crabtree. Examines the Christian response to feeling disconnected from God. (12/12; posted 3/13)
  • When the Plot Is Lost: How Shakespeare, Descartes, and the Author of Kings Navigated Cultural Crises by Tim McIntosh. Argues that narrative—story-telling—is necessary to give meaning to an information-glutted age. (11/12; posted 3/13)
  • The Way of Balaam by Ron Julian. (2 Peter 2-3) Explores the story of Balaam to explain Peter’s teaching on false teachers. (10/12; posted 3/13)
  • God Give Me Courage to Be a Nut by Jack Crabtree. Compares the “herd” mentality with that of an authentic follower of Jesus. (07/12; posted 3/13)
  • Why Do We Listen to Whom We Listen? by Jack Crabtree. Challenges the way most modern Americans judge the value and worth of a person. (06/12; posted 3/13)
  • Is Jesus’ Resurrection a Historical Fact? by David Crabtree. Discusses the biblical account of Jesus’ resurrection in light of archeology and the nature of "proof." (05/12; posted 3/13)
  • Adam Smith was no Laissez-Faire Ideologue! by Charley Dewberry. Challenges the common belief that Adam Smith, the pioneer of political economy, was a free-market ideologue. (04/12; posted 3/13)
  • Does the Sermon on the Mount Say Anything New? by David Crabtree. Compares Jesus’ teaching with rabbinic teaching of the same time period. (03/12; posted 3/13)
  • Gerard and God’s Grandeur by Tim McIntosh. Looks at the life and work of poet Gerard Manley Hopkins. (01/12; posted 3/13)
  • Rehabbing Rhetoric by Tim McIntosh. Argues for the restoration of classic rhetoric to revitalize the fruitfulness of public debate. (11/11; posted 3/13)
  • The Teaching of the Kingdom Parables by Ron Julian. (Matthew 13) Explores the picture of the coming Kingdom of God that emerges in Jesus' "Kingdom parables." (10/11; posted 3/13)
  • Chaos and Order by Chris Swanson. Discusses the shift from the view of the natural world as chaotic and to ordered and the ramifications of that shift for Western civilization. (09/11; posted 3/13)
  • Address to the Gutenberg Class of 2011 by Jack Crabtree. Gives advice to graduating seniors who desire to become wise. (08/11; posted 3/13)
  • What Would Jesus Read? by David Crabtree. Conjectures about what Jesus might have been reading during his forty days in the desert. (06/11; posted 3/13)
  • Toward a Distant Harbor by Tim McIntosh. Describes a Gutenberg education from a student's perspective. (6/12; posted 8/12)
  • Easter Fantasy by Jack Crabtree. Imagines one man's experience on Judgement Day. (4/12; posted 4/12)
  • Modern Abstract Art: Whence? And Why? by R. Wesley Hurd. Addresses common questions about abstract art. (12/11; posted 1/12)
  • The Problem of Meaninglessness by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores the ways in which intellectual culture affects finding meaning. (5/11; posted 6/11)
  • Kathy’s Take on Gutenberg College by Kathy Lamberg. Describes the educational experience at Gutenberg College. (4/11; posted 6/11)
  • The Fact of Easter by Jack Crabtree. Discusses four important implications of Jesus' resurrection. (4/11; posted 6/11)
  • War Between the Bookshelves by Tim McIntosh. Explores the difference between literature and philosophy. (3/11; posted 6/11)
  • History Lesson by David Crabtree. Describes how historical assessments can differ so dramatically. (1/11; posted 6/11)
  • Reading Through Narrative by Tim McIntosh. Relates a personal journey from doubt to belief. (4/10; posted 2/11)
  • The Future: Student Address to the 2010 Gutenberg Graduates by Jacquelyn Stollar. Speculates on the futures of the graduating class of 2010. (8/10; posted 2/11)
  • The Past: Student Address to the 2010 Gutenberg Graduates by Noah Crabtree. Reflects on the journey of four years at Gutenberg College. (8/10; posted 2/11)
  • At the Right Hand by Ron Julian. Looks at several Bible passages to discuss the past and present significance of Jesus being God’s Messiah. (12/10; posted 2/11)
  • Hidden in a Field by Ron Julian. (Matthew 13) Discusses one of Jesus’ kingdom parables. (11/10; posted 2/11)
  • Why Should Anyone Interested in Science Come to Gutenberg College? by Charley Dewberry. Explains why a Gutenberg liberal arts education is a good choice for students interested in science. (10/10; posted 2/11)
  • Equality of Dignity and Fortune by Earle Craig. Explains why a Gutenberg liberal arts education is a good choice for students interested in science. (9/10; posted 2/11)
  • President’s Address to the 2010 Gutenberg Graduates by David Crabtree. Explains the significance of a Gutenberg education. (8/10; posted 2/11)
  • Disconnected Consequences by Chris Swanson. Discusses the separation between social actions and the consequences of those actions. (6/10; posted 2/11)
  • The Critical Zone: Speculations on a Conceptual Space for Postmodern Seekers by R. Wesley Hurd. Discusses the plight of those who seek truth. (5/10; posted 2/11)
  • Hallowed Be Thy Name by Ron Julian. Elucidates the opening lines of the Lord’s Prayer. (1/10; posted 2/11)
  • Merry Anti-Climactic Christmas! by Jack Crabtree. Reflects on both the birth and resurrection of Jesus in the light of God’s purposes and promises. (12/10; posted 2/11)
  • Do the Liberal Arts Still Matter? by David Crabtree. Makes a case for the importance of teaching liberal arts, both for students and our culture. (11/10; posted 1/11)
  • 2010 Gutenberg College Commencement Address: Wild Around the Edges by Linford Detweiler. Addresses the 2010 Gutenberg College graduating class. (6/10; posted 7/10)
  • Analysis and Meaning by Chris Swanson. Describes how historical assessments can differ so dramatically. (10/08; posted 1/10)
  • The Integrity of a Truth Seeker by Toby Johnston. Discusses how our culture and Christians view "Truth" and describes the responsibility of the Truth seeker. (8/08; posted 1/10)
  • Successful Relationships by Earle Craig. Looks at the difficulties involved in relationships and offers practical, biblical advice for pursuing successful relationships. (5/08; posted 1/10)
  • The Value of Introspection by Nancy Scott. Makes a case for the importance of self-reflection in the task of loving God and others. (4/08; posted 1/10)
  • Two Thoughts on Growing Older by Kay Smith. Reflects on the fears and the realities of growing older. (6/06; posted 1/10)
  • I’m Confused, You’re Annoying, and He’s Pig-Headed. To God be the Glory! by Kay Smith. Discusses our response to the reality of God's using and forgiving sinners. (11/08; posted 1/10)
  • Persuasion by Chris Swanson. Discusses two important aspects of persuasion—trust and evidence—and the relationship between them. (11/09; posted 1/10)
  • Why Come to Gutenberg? by Kasey Pilcher. Describes one student's experience at Gutenberg College to explain what education at Gutenberg is like. (11/09; posted 1/10)
  • 2009 Gutenberg College Commencement Address: The Comic Tragedian Simply Speaking by Toby Johnston. Addresses the 2009 Gutenberg graduates on the subject of faith and the contexts in which it is made manifest. (8/09; posted 1/10)
  • Costly and Free by Ron Julian. Answers the question, "Do the promises of the gospel come to us for free or at great cost?" (1/08; posted 1/10)
  • What I Would Say by Deanna Hershiser. Discusses "belief" and encourages Christians to keep believing. (3/07; posted 1/10)
  • What God Gave Us for Christmas by Jack Crabtree. Contrasts the futility we experience in this life with God’s promise of Life in the age to come. (12/08; posted 1/10)
  • The Morality of God or the Religion of Man? by Earle Craig. Asks the question, "Why do we love to look and feel religious?" (9/08; posted 1/10)
  • Fifteen Years of Gutenberg by David Crabtree. Describes the education students receive at Gutenberg College and how it differs from most other colleges. (8/09; posted 1/10)
  • Perseverance: The Meaning of Christmas by Jack Crabtree. Proposes that the meaning of Christmas lies in the certainty that God will fulfill His promises. (12/09; posted 1/10)
  • Crucified with Christ by Larry Barber. (Galatians 2:11-20) Explores what embracing the true gospel means in the life of a believer. (8/08; posted 1/10)
  • The Friend at Midnight by Ron Julian. (Luke 11: 5-8) Clarifies Jesus’ teaching in the Parable of the Friend at Midnight and how that teaching relates to prayer. (10/09; posted 1/10)
  • A Well-rounded Christianity: Revelation 2 & 3 by Earle Craig. (Revelation 2-3) Looks at the seven letters to the churches in Revelation 2 and 3 to argue that Christians need to be well-rounded in their Christianity in order for it to be authentic. (9/09; posted 1/10)
  • Is the Gospel Just Another Ancient Myth? René Girard on Desire and the Uniqueness of the Gospels by Tim McIntosh. Presents historian/philosopher René Girard’s observations about human beings' "mimetic desire" that leads to finding scapegoats. (4/09; posted 1/10)
  • The Grace of Job by Nancy Scott. (Book of Job) Reflects on the Book of Job and what it reveals about God’s response to human suffering. (4/09; posted 1/10)
  • Journey Through Gutenberg by Jonathan Carraher. Describes what one student found at Gutenberg College that made him a "full-fledged supporter." (3/09; posted 1/10)
  • Following Jesus on the Trail to Life by Jack Crabtree. Discusses the importance of Jesus' resurrection and addresses the question, "Who will follow the resurrected Jesus into Life?" (6/09; posted 1/10)
  • The Jewishness of Christianity by Earle Craig. Looks at God’s promises and covenants to makes a case for Christianity being Jewish. (3/09; posted 1/10)
  • Thoughts on Art and Its Making by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores the definition, language, process, and effect of art. (1/09; posted 1/10)
  • 2008 Gutenberg College Commencement Address by Craig Doerksen. Addresses the 2008 Gutenberg College graduating class. (6/08; posted 7/08)
  • State of the College 2007 by David Crabtree. Describes the state of Gutenberg College in October 2007 and reaffirms the faculty's reliance on God. (12/07; posted 7/08)
  • Gutenberg Update 2005 by David Crabtree. Describes the beginnings of Gutenberg College and addresses the future of the college (from October 2005). (12/05; posted 7/08)
  • Recognizing God by David Crabtree. Discusses the nature of the “clues” the people at the time of Jesus had for recognizing Him as the Messiah and draws a lesson for believers today. (1/07; posted 7/08)
  • The Scandal of Jesus’ Birth by Jack Crabtree. Reflects on how the circumstances of Jesus’ birth foreshadowed His willingness to suffer shame and wrath on our behalf. (12/07; posted 7/08)
  • The Challenge of Easter by Jack Crabtree. Looks at the implications of Jesus as Judge. (3/08; posted 7/08)
  • Identifying and Responding to False Teachers by Jack Crabtree. Addresses the question, “How are we to interact with others who hold doctrinally significant beliefs that we think are false?” (10/07; posted 7/08)
  • The Shock of Easter by Jack Crabtree. Discusses the “shock” of the resurrection and its implications for how believers live their lives. (5/07; posted 7/08)
  • The “Magic of Christmas” by Jack Crabtree. Reflects on Christmas as a light shining in the darkness and one of the few remaining times when the story of Jesus can be freely told in the public forum. (12/06; posted 7/08)
  • Jesus, Jacques, and the American Church by Jack Crabtree. (John 3) Discusses church “technique” in light of Jesus’ interaction with Nicodemus. (3/06; posted 7/08)
  • College and Losing One’s Faith by Jack Crabtree. Comments on the college experience and Christian faith. (8/05; posted 2/08)
  • Is There a Christian Environmental Ethic? by Charley Dewberry. Defines, discusses, and compares environmental ethics. (6/07; posted 1/08)
  • A Dialogue by Ron Julian. Explores Christianity's claims as a valid and coherent worldview. (4/06; posted 1/08)
  • The Generation Gap: Then & Now by Nancy Scott. Looks at the "generation gap" from both sides of the divide. (11/07; posted 1/08)
  • “Becoming” a Christian by Nancy Scott. Reflects on the process of conversion. (4/07; posted 1/08)
  • What I’ve Learned From Dogs by Nancy Scott. Reflects on lessons about life and God. (10/06; posted 1/08)
  • Giving & Receiving in Louisiana by Nancy Scott. Observes people's need for one another in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. (5/06; posted 1/08)
  • Digging Beneath Six Feet Under by Nancy Scott. Explores how a modern television show raises and answers questions about the meaning of life and death. (1/06; posted 1/08)
  • Joy by Ron Julian. Looks at the biblical evidence for the nature of joy as a fruit of the Spirit. (8/07; posted 1/08)
  • Do You Believe in Magic? by Larry Barber. Compares biblical faith to the common myth of "magical" faith. (6/06; posted 1/08)
  • Reconciling Philosophy by Peter Wierenga. Explores the question, "Why would a Christian care to read non-Christian and even anti-Christian thinkers?" (6/05; posted 10/07)
  • Holding the Truth by R. Wesley Hurd. Discusses how Christians should hold their beliefs in a culture "allergic" to truth. (9/05; posted 10/07)
  • Thinking about Katrina by Earle Craig. Looks at God and suffering in the light of Hurricane Katrina. (10/05; posted 10/07)
  • Gaining One’s Soul by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores our culture's and the Bible's view of the soul. (8/06; posted 10/07)
  • Why the Parables? Reflections on True Understanding by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores why Jesus taught through parables and stories. (9/07; posted 10/07)
  • Is Design Science? by Chris Swanson. Looks at the philosophical assumptions behind the scientific community's view of intelligent design. (11/05; posted 1/07)
  • Measuring Up by Chris Swanson. Discusses the human desire to conform to worldly standards and how that desire relates to trusting God. (9/06; posted 1/07)
  • Pagan Christianity by Earle Craig. Compares modern Christianity and ancient pagan idolatry. (12/; posted 6/06)
  • Is Our Humanity Showing? by R. Wesley Hurd. Reflects on how the behavior of Christians often contributes to a negative view of Christianity. (1/05; posted 6/06)
  • In the Garden by Nancy Scott. Reflects on the reconciliation of human losses, pain, and suffering with the mercy and goodness of God. (5/05; posted 6/06)
  • Gutenberg Update 2004 by David Crabtree. Reports on the accomplishment of a significant milestone in the history of Gutenberg College and offers thanks to supporters. (10/04; posted 6/06)
  • The Gift of Guilt by Larry Barber. Compares the destructive influence of "false" guilt with the faith-maturing and conscience-building experience of "true" guilt that God, in His grace, gives us. (8/04; posted 6/06)
  • Satan and the Significance of Easter by Jack Crabtree. Examines the meaning of the resurrection of Christ as reflected in the role of Satan in human sin and God's purposes in history. (6/04; posted 6/06)
  • Becoming Sinners by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores how self-satisfaction and self-righteous religiosity impede understanding and accepting the truth of our sinfulness. (5/04; posted 6/06)
  • Is the Gospel Anti-Semitic? by Ron Julian. Repudiates the thesis of inherent New Testament anti-Semitism by examining the unique relationship between God, the Nation of Israel, and individual Jews. (4/04; posted 6/06)
  • A Basis for Hope by Jack Crabtree. An excerpt from The Most Real Being that explains how divine determinism is the only human hope of glorification, while limited determinism provides mere "groundless optimism" or empty despair. (11/04; posted 6/06)
  • Bad Guilt by Ron Julian. Discusses the importance of knowing God's merciful grace and believing in His promise of forgiveness while acknowledging "true guilt." (4/05; posted 6/06)
  • Examining the Purpose-Driven Life by Ron Julian. Examines Rick Warren's popular book, The Purpose-Driven Life. (8/05; posted 8/05)
  • Faith and Worry by Jack Crabtree. Explores the connection between our fears and our faith. (3/04; posted 8/04)
  • Worship: A Life Lived by Nancy Scott. Explores the nature of true worship. (1/04; posted 8/04)
  • Giving Thanks by Ron Julian. Looks at the importance of gratitude. (11/03; posted 8/04)
  • Waiting by Nancy Scott. Contemplates how "slowing down"--physically and spiritually--enables us to learn about the goodness and sovereignty of God through truly knowing our fear, pain, discomfort, and need for mercy. (9/04; posted 6/04)
  • Getting It Right by Larry Barber. Shows how a legalism contradicts the basic tenants of biblical Christianity. (12/03; posted 4/04)
  • A Different Drummer by David Crabtree. Reports Gutenberg College's progress and describes what makes it unique. (10/03; posted 3/04)
  • Is Goodness Boring? by Ron Julian. Shows how "virtue" suffers in two book-to-movie stories. (5/03; posted 3/04)
  • Believing Together by Nancy Scott. Explores the concept of "church." (9/03; posted 3/04)
  • There Must be Fifty Ways to be a Pharisee by Jack Crabtree. Explores the essence of Phariseeism and how it manifests itself today. (4/03; posted 3/04)
  • Christians & Serious Art by R. Wesley Hurd. Discusses the nature of fine art and the challenges for the Christian artist. (6/03; posted 2/04)
  • Honestly Connecting by Nancy Scott. Discusses how honest communication about life's struggles is part of a Christian's sanctification. (1/03; posted 9/03)
  • Academic Freedom by David Crabtree. Gives a historical perspective on the concept of academic freedom and shows how it manifests itself at Gutenberg College. (12/02; posted 9/03)
  • Fundamentalism and Biblical Interpretation by Ron Julian. Looks at the impact of Christian fundamentalism on how we understand and apply the Bible's teaching. (11/02; posted 9/03)
  • Coping with Culture by David Crabtree. Discusses how a Christian can relate to culture without compromising himself. (9/02; posted 10/02)
  • Waiting for God by Ron Julian. Discusses the biblical virtue of patience. (10/02; posted 10/02)
  • Desiring Truth by R. Wesley Hurd. Discusses what an individual's response to truth signifies. (8/02; posted 8/02)
  • Confronting Reality by Nancy Scott. Uses the film A Beautiful Mind to discuss the connection between facing reality and our mental health. (5/02; posted 6/02)
  • Motivations: The Heart of the Matter by Larry Barber. Looks at Luke 12:1-5 to discuss how behavior reveals motivations. (6/02; posted 6/02)
  • Osama & Me by Ron Julian. Responds to society's growing intolerance to the truth claims of Christianity. (4/02; posted 4/02)
  • Easter Unbelief by Jack Crabtree. Uses the disciples' response to the resurrection to discuss the biblical basis for faith. (3/02; posted 3/02)
  • Where was God? by Margaret Sholaas. Discusses our understanding of God and the existence of evil. (1/02; posted 3/02)
  • The Thief in the Night by Ron Julian. (Matthew 24: 42-51) Discusses what should be our attitude toward end-time events. (12/01; posted 3/02)
  • Answers to Chapter One by Ron Julian. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter one of The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Answers to Chapter Two by David Crabtree. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter two of The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Answers to Chapter Three by David Crabtree. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter three of The Language of God. (2/; posted 2/02)
  • Answers to Chapter Four by Ron Julian. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter four of The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Answers to Chapter Six by David Crabtree. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter six of The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Answers to Chapter Seven by David Crabtree. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter seven of The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Answers to Chapter Eight by Jack Crabtree. Provides answers to the study questions at the end of chapter eight of The Language of God. (1/03; posted 2/02)
  • Understanding the Bible by Jack Crabtree. Reinforces and supplements some points made in The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Commonsense Interpretation by Jack Crabtree. Shows the original, longer version of the conclusion to The Language of God. (2/02; posted 2/02)
  • Seekers, Truth, & Fulfillment by R. Wesley Hurd. Asks whether we can find a vision of life that is true. (4/01; posted 1/02)
  • Considering Courage & Truth by Nancy Scott. Explores how moral courage relates to our view of truth. (11/01; posted 1/02)
  • Growing Up by Nancy Scott. Uses news of a young person's drug overdose to discuss the choices parents and children face in our culture. (9/00; posted 1/02)
  • Paradigm Shifts by Larry Barber. Discusses the nature of the radical change that occurs in the heart of a believer. (5/00; posted 1/02)
  • Living in the Past by Larry Barber. Tells why we should not "forget what lies behind." (6/01; posted 1/02)
  • Feelings & Responsibility by Nancy Scott. Explores the need for understanding and taking responsibility for our own feelings. (3/01; posted 1/02)
  • MSC & Me by Deanna Hershiser. Describes how MSC helped one person to a more accurate biblical understanding. (10/00; posted 1/02)
  • McKenzie Study Center & Gutenberg College by R. Wesley Hurd. Describes the relationship between Gutenberg College and the MSC and Art Project ministries. (9/01; posted 1/02)
  • Engaging the Culture by David Crabtree. Discusses how parents can protect their children against cultural seduction. (10/01; posted 1/02)
  • Why Gutenberg College? by Gutenberg Faculty. Explains the goals in founding Gutenberg College. (5/01; posted 1/02)
  • The Prayer of Jabez by Ron Julian. Examines the popular book "The Prayer of Jabez." (7/01; posted 1/02)
  • Faithfulness: Building the Temple Anyway by Jack Crabtree. Uses the example of the returned Jewish exiles to describe what makes a ministry faithful. (11/00; posted 1/02)
  • Regret by Margaret Sholaas. Considers human regrets in the light of the sovereignty of God. (6/96; posted 1/02)
  • The Parable of the Rock Garden by Jack Crabtree. Explains how love of the church and criticism of the church can and must go together. (4/96; posted 1/02)
  • Has the Time of the Gentiles Passed? by Jack Crabtree. Asks whether the spiritual darkness of our generation indicates that the "time of the Gentiles" is over. (10/97; posted 1/02)
  • Longing for Glory by Ron Julian. (I Corinthians 3:18) Defines the "glory" that is the hope of every believer. (6/00; posted 1/02)
  • Only One Thing Necessary by Jack Crabtree. (Luke 10:38-42) Explores Jesus' puzzling interaction with Mary and Martha. (11/99; posted 1/02)
  • A Story Observed by Larry Barber. (Luke 10:25-37) Unpacks the story of the Good Samaritan and the interaction which leads to it. (5/96; posted 1/02)
  • The Struggle to See by Larry Barber. (Luke 10:30-35) Discusses the parable of the Good Samaritan. (10/99; posted 1/02)
  • To Live is Christ by Jack Crabtree. Reconsiders the 1960s generation as an unlikely role-model. (11/98; posted 2/01)
  • The Camera Lies by David Crabtree. Examines the problem of knowing the truth about our leaders in a media culture. (9/98; posted 2/01)
  • Culture by R. Wesley Hurd. Explores the challenges and opportunities of living in a particular culture. (1/99; posted 2/01)
  • Preparing for Y2K by David Crabtree. Assessed the real dangers of the Y2K problem. (3/01; posted 2/01)
  • The Importance of History by David Crabtree. Discusses the nature of history and the proneness to revisionism in the writing of history. (11/93; posted 2/01)
  • At the Feet of the State by David Crabtree. Describes the shift of our government from protector to social engineer. (3/91; posted 2/01)
  • A Review of Darwin’s “The Origin of Species” by Charley Dewberry. Explains and critiques the argument of "one of the most important books written within the past 150 years." (3/92; posted 2/01)
  • Postmodernism by R. Wesley Hurd. Explains the nature and impact of postmodernism. (6/98; posted 2/01)
  • Me and My Worldview by R. Wesley Hurd. Illuminates the concept of a worldview and why it is important. (9/96; posted 2/01)
  • Sometimes It’s Not Nice To Love by Margaret Sholaas. Shows how true love sometimes requires a painful honesty. (3/95; posted 2/01)
  • An Abortion That Should Have Been? by Margaret Sholaas. Considers the worth and meaning of a human life in the face of great suffering and loss. (4/94; posted 2/01)
  • Dueling with Dualism by Nancy Scott. Argues that dualism is a continuing trap for today's church. (7/93; posted 2/01)
  • Modern Madness by David Crabtree. Explores how moral relativism has contributed to our inability to understand the world. (6/93; posted 2/01)
  • The Obstacle of Affluence by David Crabtree. Shows the difficulties of growing up to learn responsibility in an age of affluence. (4/00; posted 2/01)
  • Dignity and Death by Nancy Scott. Critiques the idea of "death with dignity" from a biblical perspective. (11/94; posted 2/01)
  • Musings on Life and Loss by Nancy Scott. Explores the process of grief and the ways God uses that process in the lives of Christians. (10/98; posted 2/01)
  • Trusting God, Loving Others by Nancy Scott. Encourages us to move past blaming others for past hurts and to take responsibility for ourselves. (5/97; posted 2/01)
  • The Psychology of Self-Justification by Larry Barber. Assesses the spiritual dangers of hiding from our own guilt. (2/99; posted 2/01)
  • Being Between by R. Wesley Hurd. Examines the ambiguous nature of the believer's experience in this life. (6/99; posted 2/01)
  • Money and Contentment by Ron Julian. Explores the connection between genuine Christian faith and our attitudes about money. (8/95; posted 2/01)
  • McKenzie Study Center by R. Wesley Hurd. Narrates the history of MSC and the distinctives which characterize it. (7/95; posted 2/01)
  • How to Prepare for College by David Crabtree. Argues for the priority of character development in preparing for college. (9/99; posted 2/01)
  • Two Challenges by Jack Crabtree. Addresses the 1998 Gutenberg College graduating class. (7/98; posted 2/01)
  • The Tempter’s Craft by David David. Uses the story of the fall to warn college-bound students about the nature of temptation. (10/96; posted 2/01)
  • Can Spiritual Man Learn from Natural Man? by Jack Crabtree. Refutes the idea that Christians have nothing to learn from unbelievers. (8/96; posted 2/01)
  • Why a Great Books Education is the Most Practical! by David Crabtree. Challenges the perception that a great books education is impractical in today's world. (3/96; posted 2/01)
  • Rethinking Education by David Crabtree. Discusses the goal of education and its implications for teaching strategies. (2/92; posted 2/01)
  • Why We Are (gulp!) Home Schooling by Ron Julian. Presents the issues that led one family to home school their children. (11/93; posted 2/01)
  • Letter to the School Board by Jack Crabtree. Addresses problems created by lack of philosophical bases for the public schools' AIDS/HIV curriculum. (10/93; posted 2/01)
  • Carpe Deum by Margaret Sholaas. Addresses the 2000 Gutenberg College graduating class. (6/00; posted 2/01)
  • How the Story Ends by Ron Julian. Reviews three movies that highlight our culture's semi-biblical view of death. (8/99; posted 2/01)
  • The Artful in Us All by R. Wesley Hurd. Describes the inevitable place of art in human experience and the challenge of Christian artmaking. (6/97; posted 2/01)
  • Creating in Faith by Jeff Johnson. Reflections on being an artist and a Christian. (6/91; posted 2/01)
  • Art and Modern Art by R. Wesley Hurd. Considers how modern art speaks and what it is saying about the human condition. (1/91; posted 2/01)
  • A Little Light Reading by Ron Julian. Presents a personal appreciation of Christian values in the arts, as seen in the Father Brown stories. (6/92; posted 2/01)
  • A Room Full of Books by Jeff Johnson. Portrays the value of books in our spiritual journey. (2/94; posted 2/01)
  • Thoughts on Art, Popular Culture, and the Gospel by Tucker A. Teague. Explores the effect of the popular visual arts on our perception of reality and the communication of the gospel. (9/94; posted 2/01)
  • After Virtue by R. Wesley Hurd. Portrays the departure of the ideal of virtue from the arts and popular culture. (2/95; posted 2/01)
  • Artistic Calling in the Church by R. Wesley Hurd. Defends the legitimacy of art as a calling for believers. (8/93; posted 2/01)
  • Schindler’s List by R. Wesley Hurd. Reflects on the significance of Spielberg's film to the baby-boom generation. (3/94; posted 2/01)
  • Outer Limitations by Nancy Scott. Highlights the worldview assumptions behind the classic sci-fi series, "The Outer Limits." (1/94; posted 2/01)
  • The New Spirituality by R. Wesley . Highlights the difference between the "new" spirituality and the biblical view of spirituality. (3/rd; posted 2/01)
  • The Unimportant Birth of the Insignificant Jesus by Jack Crabtree. Highlights the surprising and instructive way that God brought His Son into the world. (12/99; posted 2/01)
  • The Significance of Passover by Nancy Scott. Explores what God was saying in the events of the Passover. (5/99; posted 2/01)
  • Practically Speaking by Ron Julian. Asserts that often the most valuable and "practical" teaching is the most theoretical. (4/99; posted 2/01)
  • The Evil in Us All by Larry Barber. Argues for the seriousness of the problem of sin. (3/98; posted 2/01)
  • Real Spirituality by Larry Barber. Defines the biblical concept of spirituality. (5/98; posted 2/01)
  • Reconciled Enemies by Nancy Scott. Encourages us to resist the pressure to perform in our relationship with God. (4/98; posted 2/01)
  • Trusting the God Who Made Hell by Margaret Sholaas. Emphasizes and reconciles the justice and love of God. (4/97; posted 2/01)
  • What Sort of People? by Ron Julian. Exhorts believers to personally wrestle with and embrace the gospel. (3/97; posted 2/01)
  • Pain and Glory by Nancy Scott. Illustrates the role of suffering in the believer's path to glory. (1/97; posted 2/01)
  • Treasuring These Things in Our Hearts by Jack Crabtree. Asks how the extraordinary events of Jesus' birth were so easily forgotten. (12/96; posted 2/01)
  • Have Yourself a Mary Little Christmas by Jack Crabtree. Portrays the hardships and faith of Mary as a model for the Christian life. (12/95; posted 2/01)
  • Will He Find Faith? by Robby Julian. Argues that the reality of Christ's return ought to change the way we think about our lives. (9/95; posted 2/01)
  • Forgiveness by Larry Barber. Argues that forgiving is not forgetting. (1/92; posted 2/01)
  • The Most Important Things in Life by Ron Julian. Examines the nature of the true wisdom which arises from Christian faith. (9/87; posted 2/01)
  • Christianity by Jack Crabtree. Asserts that true godliness is not necessarily religious. (9/98; posted 2/01)
  • Drawing the Line by Ron Julian. Proposes a biblical model for deciding when to "draw the line" over doctrinal disagreements. (9/90; posted 2/01)
  • The Miracle of Sophrosune by Jack Crabtree. Describes the Greek and biblical virtue of 'sophrosune' and its implications for the problem of self-hatred. (4/93; posted 2/01)
  • The Anatomy of Sainthood by Jack Crabtree. Draws the "portrait" of a saint to answer the question "Who will be saved?" Discusses the role of belief in salvation. (4/92; posted 2/01)
  • Chosen for Glory by Ron Julian. Explores the way in which the Bible's teaching on the Christian life can only be understood in the light of God's sovereign control of His creation. (2/93; posted 2/01)
  • A Christmas Message by Jack Crabtree. Laments that the popular idea of "the true meaning of Christmas" obscures the true meaning of Christmas. (12/94; posted 2/01)
  • Up With Legalism! by Jack Crabtree. Shows how opposition to "legalism" and indifference to righteousness are by no means the same thing. (5/93; posted 2/01)
  • Biblical? by Ron Julian. Asserts that "doing what the Bible says" is not always biblical. (1/01; posted 2/01)
  • Appeal for Radical Biblicism by Jack Crabtree. Calls for a radical commitment to the search for what the Bible actually means. (8/97; posted 2/01)
  • Bible Study for What Ails Us by Jack Crabtree. (Revelation 2:1-11) Defends the importance of pursuing doctrinal understanding. (12/97; posted 2/01)
  • Sharper Than Any Sword by Jack Crabtree. (Hebrews 4:12-13) Explains how the proclamation of the gospel lays bare the hidden person of the heart. (10/94; posted 2/01)
  • The Next Time I Study Revelation by Ron Julian. (Revelation) Sheds light on the nature of the Bible's most enigmatic book. (8/98; posted 2/01)
  • The Holiness of Financial Independence by Jack Crabtree. (I Thessalonians 4:9-12) Explores Paul's teaching about "working with your hands" and its implications for Christian fundraising. (10/95; posted 2/01)
  • The Tao of Faith by Jack Crabtree. (Galatians 5) Discusses the concept of 'woo we' in Taoism and the striking parallels between it and the Evangelical understanding of "walking by the Spirit." (2/94; posted 2/01)
  • My Next Mid-life Crisis by Ron Julian. (I Corinthians 12, 13) Presents I Corinthians 12 and 13 as the ultimate answer to a believer's "mid-life crisis." (9/91; posted 2/01)
  • In Defense of God’s Love by Ron Julian. (Romans 5:1-11) Uses Romans 5 to describe and clarify the enigmatic love of God. (2/97; posted 2/01)
  • The Prayers of Paul by Ron Julian. Holds up the great prayers of Paul as a mirror in which to examine our fundamental commitments. (2/96; posted 2/01)
  • Two Reflections on Thomas and the Story of Easter by Jack Crabtree. (John 20:24-29) Portrays "doubting Thomas" as a model for truth-seeking and a lesson in the miracle of faith. (6/94; posted 2/01)
  • Counting the Cost by Ron Julian. (Luke 14:26-33) Proposes that we OUGHT to be like the man who doesn't build a tower and the king who doesn't go to battle. (8/94; posted 2/01)
  • Bigotry by Larry Barber. (Luke 18:10-14) Uses the parable of the tax-gatherer and the Pharisee to define true bigotry. (9/93; posted 2/01)
  • Testing God by Ron Julian. (Matthew 4:5-7) Looks at the prohibition against "testing God" found in the second temptation of Jesus. (2/98; posted 2/01)
  • The Parable of the Ten Virgins by Jack Crabtree. (Matthew 25:1-13) Explains the parable as a call to a deep and persevering desire for the kingdom of God. (1/95; posted 2/01)
  • Unorthodoxy by Jack Crabtree. (Matthew 25:14-30) Asserts that "orthodoxy" can be a way of burying one's talent in the ground. (12/93; posted 2/01)
  • The Power of the Parables by Ron Julian. (Matthew 13) Presents the dynamic manner in which the parables of Jesus communicate. (4/93; posted 2/01)
  • Hypocrisy of Another Kind by Larry Barber. (Luke 12:1-5) Explains what Jesus meant by "the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy." (11/96; posted 2/01)
  • Futility by R. Wesley Hurd. (Ecclesiastes) Explores the dark, realistic vision of life found in Ecclesiastics. (1/96; posted 2/01)
  • The Lord is My Shepherd by Ron Julian. (Psalm 23) Explains the life and death issues involved in Psalm 23. (7/97; posted 2/01)
  • In Praise of Manna by Jack Crabtree. (Deuteronomy 8:1-10) Illustrates the place of suffering in the Christian life through the story of the manna in the wilderness. (5/95; posted 2/01)
  • The Lesson of the Exodus by David Crabtree. (Exodus) Draws the analogy between how God dealt with Israel in the exodus and how He deals with us today. (9/97; posted 2/01)
  • Understanding the Second Commandment by Jack Crabtree. (Exodus 20:4-6) Highlights the transcendent nature of God taught by the commandment against "graven images." (6/95; posted 2/01)

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